Re-Planting A Mid Summer Vegetable Garden – A 2nd Chance For Harvest!


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Categories: Green

After harvesting early-maturing vegetables such as salad greens, radishes, peas and spinach, gardeners can plant other crops in midsummer for fall harvest. Some root crops, greens and other vegetables can be successfully grown from late June, July or even August plantings. It's important to know the average first frost date in your area, in order to calculate when to plant these late vegetables so they'll mature before being killed by cold weather. Find the average first fall frost dates in your area using Minnesota's Climate Divisions map along with the following descriptions.

Some vegetables will tolerate a fair amount of frost and keep growing even when temperatures are in the low forties. Others can't tolerate frost and stop growing in cool weather. Bush snap beans, for instance, mature in 45-65 days, but even a light frost (temperatures between 30° and 32°F) will kill the plants. Kale, on the other hand, takes just as long to mature, but plants continue to grow when temperatures are cool, and can survive cold down to about 20°F. So cool-season vegetables including kale and others in the cabbage family may be the best choice for mid-summer sowing, because an earlier-than-expected frost won't kill them before they're ready to eat. Many of the cold-tolerant vegetables actually have better quality when grown in cool weather; it's said that the frost "sweetens" them. The following table provides information about recommended late-season vegetables.

Despite what many people think, July is definitely not too late to start planting vegetables in the garden. If circumstances have prevented you from planting in the spring--perhaps you've just purchased a new house or have been traveling over the spring and early summer--it is probably too late for some of the early season vegetables, or those that day a very long time to mature. For example, in all but the warmest climates, tomatoes need to be planted earlier in the season in order to mature and ripen.

For these, you'll need to wait for next spring. But for many other edibles, there is still enough time for them to mature for harvest in fall.

And in an established garden, there are many quick-maturing vegetables that can now be planted for a second or either third time for the season--carrots or lettuce, for example. And finally, July is a great time to sow those vegetables that typically are harvested through the late fall.  

The lists given below, arranged by U.S. region, show which vegetables and herbs you can plant in July. Unless specifically listed as "transplants" the items in this list can be direct-sown in your garden this month.

What to Plant in the Central U.S./Midwest in Late July - August

  • Basil
  • Beans
  • Beets
  • Broccoli (Transplants)
  • Brussels sprouts (Transplants)
  • Cabbage (Transplants)
  • Carrots
  • Cauliflower (Transplants)
  • Cilantro
  • Cucumbers
  • Kale
  • Parsley
  • Radishes
  • Summer Squash
  • Swiss Chard
  • Turnips
  • Winter Squash

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What to Plant in New England and the Mid-Atlantic Region in Late July - August

  • Arugula 
  • Basil (Transplants)
  • Beans
  • Beets
  • Brussels sprouts (Transplants)
  • Cabbage (Transplants)
  • Carrots
  • Cilantro
  • Cucumbers
  • Kale
  • Leeks (Transplants)
  • Lettuce
  • Parsley
  • Radishes
  • Swiss Chard
  • Turnips
  • Winter Squash

What to Plant in the North Central U.S., Rocky Mountains in Late July - August

  • Arugula
  • Beets
  • Broccoli (Transplants)
  • Cabbage (Transplants)
  • Carrots
  • Cilantro
  • Dill
  • Kale
  • Lettuce
  • Parsley
  • Radishes
  • Spinach
  • Turnips

What to Plant in the Pacific Northwest in Late July - August

  • Arugula
  • Beans
  • Beets
  • Broccoli
  • Brussels sprouts (Transplants)
  • Cabbage (Transplants)
  • Carrots
  • Cauliflower (Transplants)
  • Cilantro
  • Dill
  • Kale
  • Lettuce
  • Parsley
  • Peas
  • Radishes
  • Swiss Chard
  • Turnips

What to Plant in the Southeast/Gulf Coast Region in Late July - August

  • Basil
  • Beans
  • Beets
  • Carrots
  • Cilantro
  • Collard greens
  • Cucumbers
  • Dill
  • Eggplant (Transplants)
  • Peppers (Transplants)
  • Pumpkins
  • Tomato (Transplants)
  • Winter Squash

What to Plant in the Southwest in Late July - August

  • Basil
  • Beans
  • Cilantro
  • Corn
  • Cucumbers
  • Dill
  • Peppers (Transplants)
  • Summer Squash
  • Tomato (Transplants)
  • Winter Squash

via OldGrowGardenFarms

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